[PRESS STATEMENT] DON’T CALL IN THE DEFENCE FORCE IN THE WESTERN CAPE – REALLOCATE POLICE RESOURCES

  Poor black neighbourhoods with high rates of violent crime have less police resources than wealthier, whiter and safer suburbs Police resources should be reallocated to where they are urgently needed – in areas that are suffering from violent crimes The Western Cape provincial police commissioner has the power to do this today This is…

Khayelitsha Residents To March At Night For Street Lighting

On Monday night, 4 February 2013, members of Equal Education (EE), the Social Justice Coalition (SJC) and the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) will march through the streets of Khayelitsha to demand adequate public lighting. The march will begin at 19h30 at the Town Two market, on the corner of Lansdowne Road and Spine Road. Marchers…

SJC/NU Calls on City of Cape Town to Release Service Delivery Agreements For Contractors Operating In Informal Settlements

The Social Justice Coalition (SJC) has observed that refuse collection in informal settlements is often irregular and of very poor quality. Refuse is often left rotting for days or weeks, contributing to the spread of disease.

All refuse collection for informal settlements in the City of Cape Town is outsourced to private contractors, which in our view limits accountability and recourse. In addition, the provision and maintenance of sanitation services, which are also outsourced, are either non-existent or of a poor quality.

SJC Responds to City’s Condemnation of “Toilet Queue”

Cape Town, 23 March 2010 – On Saturday 20 March, the Social Justice Coalition (SJC) organised a queue of approximately 600 people outside a public toilet on the Sea Point Promenade as part of The World Toilet Queue – an international demonstration scheduled to coincide with World Water Day – to highlight the plight of the 2.5 billion people worldwide who do not have access to basic sanitation. It was also arranged to draw attention to the lack of basic sanitation services in the City of Cape Town and highlight how this affects residents’ health and safety, as well as the disproportionate investment in formal as opposed to informal settlements. It was further designed to coincide with the Human Rights Day weekend, to illustrate how numerous rights, particularly those of dignity and security, are still deprived to hundreds of thousands of Capetonians, and indeed millions more across the country.

The Long Walk to Human Dignity

CAPE TOWN, 21 March 2010 – This weekend people across the country mark Human Rights Day. Today marks the 50th anniversary of the Sharpeville massacre on 21 March 1960. Deep sorrow and joy enter our thoughts when we pay tribute to those who died for the rights we enjoy today. The 69 people brutally massacred and the hundreds injured at Sharpeville peacefully demanding the scrapping of the Pass Laws. These laws were arguably the colonial and Apartheid state’s cruelest acts which denied freedom of movement and dignity to the majority of Black people.

Queue for Sanitation, Safety & Dignity!

How often do you fear for your safety when using a toilet?

For many, going to the toilet or accessing clean drinking water might seem like the most fundamental of service provisions and rights, but it is routinely denied to half a million people living in the City of Cape Town’s informal settlements.

Residents currently have to share one toilet amongst thirteen households (despite the law regulating five per household), and toilets are often dysfunctional, poorly maintained, unhygienic, unsafe and very sparsely located.